A side dish worth pulling your tooth out and dying for.

A man on the run needs a quick fix to add to his meal on the go. Maybe he’ll find a little redheaded friend to share a sausage sandwich with.

heinzkrugersaurkraut

Sauerkraut for Heinz Kruger

1 can or jar of sauerkraut
Brown Sugar
Cinnamon
Salt

First RINSE the sauerkraut in a colander under cold water to remove most of the brine.
Put in a pot with enough water to cover the bottom and then the sauerkraut.
Put about a handful or so of brown sugar in the sauerkraut.
Add about a half a tablespoon of cinnamon or so to it.
Then add a pinch of salt or a quick shake or two from your salt shaker.

Mix everything together while the sauerkraut is heating and coming to a boil. The sauerkraut should have a tan/brownish color to it. when at a boil turn it down to medium-low to low heat and let the sauerkraut simmer while you finish getting the rest of your meal together.

This recipe and picture was submitted by @Mlea64, who admires Richard’s charitability ,honesty, humility & private nature. She loves his eyes they seem to always have a twinkle in them, his smile & his nose–all great qualities! Who knew the double-crossing Heinz could have so much to admire.

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7 thoughts on “A side dish worth pulling your tooth out and dying for.

  1. Ahahahaha – as a German I heartily approve. Krüger would have loved his sauerkraut. May I offer some advice on cooking sauerkraut, though? My family makes their own sauerkraut – cutting the cabbage, pickling it, leaving it to mature – and the secret to sauerkraut is actually to NOT boil it. It needs to heated, for sure, but if you boil it – and especially if you boil it for very long – it becomes acidicly sour. Mind you, your version of sauerkraut with brown sugar and cinnamon would probably take care of the acid. (It would’ve probably been unheard of in 1940s Germany, though.) Thanks for this recipe, however – and I love the whole concept of your blog. Looking forward to what you have cooking for my favourite RA incarnation, the boiling hot Guy of Gisborne!

  2. Polish people love their sauerkraut and every year for November 1st meaning All Saints Day I prepare an army-size pot of Bigos which is cabbage, onions and plenty of meat.
    I’d like to say that I agree Heinzy would eat it. After all, apparently sauerkraut is an afrodisiac and I’ve always felt that there’s a promise of softness beneath that rigid 3-piece suit 😉

  3. The recipe originally came from a German woman, who I think was from the Bavarian region, that my step-mother had known when they were both Navy wives, in the U.S. Navy, and some of the wives would swap recipes.

  4. Yummy! Love good sauerkraut! The cooking would kill the enzymes so some might consider that a shame/ a sacrilege 🙂 I can’t imagine cinnamon combined w sauerkraut, so I definitely will have to try this.

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